Home | Legals | Data Protection | KIT

Digital Services

Digital Services
type: Vorlesung (V) links:
semester: SS 2020
time: 2020-04-22
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau


2020-04-29
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-05-06
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-05-13
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-05-20
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-05-27
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-06-03
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-06-10
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-06-17
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-06-24
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-07-01
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-07-08
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-07-15
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau

2020-07-22
09:45 - 11:15 wöchentlich
10.11 Sitzungssaal Hauptgebäude (R223)
10.11 Verwaltungsgebäude, Hauptbau


lecturer: Prof. Dr. Gerhard Satzger
Prof. Dr. York Sure-Vetter
Dr.-Ing. Niklas Kühl
Prof. Dr. Christof Weinhardt
sws: 2
lv-no.: <a target="lvn" href="https://campus.studium.kit.edu/events/NsTFPiMiTmCQYRO0VmML-g">2595466</a>
Notes

The world is moving more and more towards “service-led” economies: in developed countries services already account for around 70% of gross value added. In order to design, engineer, and manage services, traditional “goods-oriented” models are often inappropriate. In addition, the rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) pushes the economic importance of services that are rendered electronically (eServices) and, thus, drives competitive changes: increased interaction and individualization open up new dimensions of “value co-creation” between providers and customers; dynamic and scalable service value networks replace static value chains; digital services can be globally delivered and exchanged across today’s geographic boundaries. Building on a systematic categorization of (e)Services and on the general notion of “value co-creation”, we cover concepts and foundations for engineering and managing IT-based services, allowing for further specialization in subsequent KSRI courses. Topics include service innovation, service economics, service modeling as well as the transformation and coordination of service value networks. In addition, case studies, hands-on exercises and guest lectures will illustrate the applicability of the concepts. English language is used throughout the course to acquaint students with international environments.

Description

The world is moving more and more towards “service-led” economies: in developed countries services already account for around 70% of gross value added. In order to design, engineer, and manage services, traditional “goods-oriented”models are often inappropriate. In addition, the rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) pushes the economic importance of services that are rendered electronically (eServices) and, thus, drives competitive changes: increased interaction and individualization open up new dimensions of “value co-creation” between providers and customers; dynamic and scalable service value networks replace static value chains; digital services can be globally delivered and exchanged across today’s geographic boundaries; Building on a systematic categorization of (e)Services and on the general notion of “value co-creation”, we cover concepts and foundations for engineering and managing IT-based services, allowing for further specialization in subsequent KSRI courses. Topics include service innovation, service economics, service modeling as well as the transformation and coordination of service value networks. In addition, case studies, hands-on exercises and guest lectures will illustrate the applicability of the concepts. English language is used throughout the course to acquaint students with international environments.

Bibliography
  • Anderson, J./ Nirmalya, K. / Narus, J. (2007), Value Merchants.
  • Lovelock, C. / Wirtz, J. (2007) Services Marketing, 6th ed.
  • Meffert, H./Bruhn, M. (2006), Dienstleistungsmarketing, 5. Auflage,
  • Spohrer, J. et al. (2007), Steps towards a science of service systems. In: IEEE Computer, 40 (1), p. 70-77
  • Stauss, B. et al. (Hrsg.) (2007), Service Science – Fundamentals Challenges and Future Developments.
  • Teboul, (2007), Services is Front Stage.
  • Vargo, S./Lusch, R. (2004) Evolving to a New Dominant Logic for Marketing, in: Journal of Marketing 68(1): 1–17.
  • Shapiro, C. / Varian, H. (1998), Information Rules - A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy
Content of teaching

The world is moving more and more towards "service-led" economies: in developed countries services already account for around 70% of gross value added. In order to design, engineer, and manage services, traditional "goods-oriented" models are often inappropriate. In addition, the rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) pushes the economic importance of services that are rendered electronically (eServices) and, thus, drives competitive changes: increased interaction and individualization open up new dimensions of "value co-creation" between providers and customers; dynamic and scalable service value networks replace static value chains; digital services can be globally delivered and exchanged across today's geographic boundaries;

Building on a systematic categorization of (e)Services and on the general notion of "value co-creation", we cover concepts and foundations for engineering and managing IT-based services, allowing for further specialization in subsequent KSRI courses. Topics include service innovation, service economics, service modeling as well as the transformation and coordination of service value networks.

In addition, case studies, hands-on exercises and guest lectures will illustrate the applicability of the concepts. English language is used throughout the course to acquaint students with international environments.

Entryrequirements

None.

Annotation

Former title "Foundations of Digital Services A"

Workload

The total workload for this course is approximately 135 hours. For further information see German version.

Aim

This course conveys the fundamental knowledge to understand the importance of services in our economy and the impact of information and communication technology (ICT) on existing and emerging service industries. Combining theoretical models with multiple case studies and application scenarios, this course will enable students:

  • to understand different service perspectives and apply the general concept of "value co-creation"
  • to know and to be able to apply concepts, methods and tools used for the design, engineering and management of eServices
  • to be familiar with current research topics
  • to gain experience in group work and to improve their presentation skills
  • to be exposed to English language in preparation for working in international environments
Exam description

The assessment consists of a written exam (60 min) (according to §4(2), 1 of the examination regulation). By successful completion of the exercises (according to §4(2), 3 of the examination regulation) a bonus can be obtained. If the grade of the written exam is at least 4.0 and at most 1.3, the bonus will improve it by one grade level (i.e. by 0.3 or 0.4). The bonus only applies to the first and second exam of the semester in which it was obtained.